Tag Archive | rotator cuff surgery

Arthroscopy: A Surgical Procedure

Arthroscopy is a surgical method that orthopedic surgeons use to visualize, diagnose, and treat injuries inside a joint. The word Arthroscopy comes from two Greek words that are: “arthro” (joint) and “skopein” (to look). The term literally means “to look within the joint.”

What is an arthroscopic surgery?

Arthroscopy is a technique for diagnosing and treating joint problems. A surgeon inserts a very narrow tube attached to a fiber-optic video camera through a small incision — about the size of a buttonhole. The vision inside your joint is transmitted to a high-definition video monitor. Arthroscopy lets the surgeon to see inside your joint without making a large incision. Orthopaedic Surgeons can even repair some types of joint injuries during arthroscopy, with pencil-thin surgical instruments inserted through additional small incisions.

When is knee arthroscopy recommended?

Your doctor may recommend knee arthroscopy if you have painful condition that does not respond to nonsurgical treatment. Some reasons for undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery include:

  1. Removal or a repair of a torn meniscus
  2. Reconstruction of a torn anterior cruciate ligament
  3. Removal of inflamed synovial tissue
  4. Trimming of damaged articular cartilage
  5. Removal of loose fragments of bones or cartilage
  6. Treatment of patella (kneecap) problems
  7. Knee sepsis (infection)

When is shoulder arthroscopy recommended?

Your doctor may recommend shoulder arthroscopy if you have painful condition that does not respond to nonsurgical treatment. Some reasons for undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery include

  1. Bankart Repair
  2. Rotator Cuff Repair
  3. Slap Repair
  4. Capsulotomy for Adhesive capsulitis
  5. AC Joint Resection

How is arthroscopy performed?

Arthroscopic surgery, although much easier in terms of recovery than “open” surgery, still requires the use of anesthetics and the special equipment in a hospital operating room or outpatient surgical suite. You will be given a general, spinal, or a local anesthetic, depending on the joint or suspected problem.

A small incision (about the size of a buttonhole) will be made to insert the arthroscope. Several other incisions may be made to see other parts of the joint or insert other instruments.

Recovering from an arthroscopy:

After your arthroscopy, you’ll be taken to a room to get better from the effects of the general anesthetics, if it was used during the process. Depending on the type of method you had, you may require a temporary sling, splint or crutches to support and guard the joint while you recover. Some people are given special pumps or compression bandages to improve their blood flow.

Recovery advice by surgeons

  1. Ensure that you elevate the joint and apply ice packs to help with swelling when you get home, only if advised to do so. You should also carry out any joint exercises that have been suggested for you.
  2. Any dressings which have been done during the process will need to be kept as dry as possible.
  3. Your wounds should start to recover within a few days. If non-dissolvable stiches were used to close them, they need to be removed after a week or two.
  4. You’ll normally be asked to be present at a follow-up appointment a few weeks after the surgery to discuss the results of the operation, your recovery, and any additional treatment you may need.
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Shoulder Surgery – Solution to Let You Perform Greater in Sport Field

What Are Sports Injuries?

The term “sports injury,” in the broadest sense, actually refers to the kinds of injuries that mostly occur during sports or workout. Some sports damages result from accidents; others are due to poor workout training practices, wrong equipment, lack of conditioning, or inadequate warm-up and stretching.

Following are the most common sports injuries:

Common Types of Sports Injuries are:

  1. Tears of the ligaments that hold joints together
  2. Tears of the tendons that support joints and help them to move
  3. Dislocated joints
  4. Muscle sprains and strains
  5. Fractured bones; including vertebrae.

What Is the Difference Between Acute and Chronic Injuries?

Irrespective of the specific structure affected, musculoskeletal sports injuries can usually be classified in one of two ways: acute or chronic.

Acute Injuries

Acute injuries, such as a sprained ankle, strained back or fractured hand, happen suddenly during any physical activity. Signs of an acute injury include the following:

  1. Sudden and extreme pain
  2. Inability to place weight on a lower limb
  3. Swelling
  4. Extreme painfulness in an upper limb
  5. Extreme limb weakness
  6. Visible dislocation
  7. Inability to move a joint through its full range of motion

Chronic Injuries

Chronic injuries generally result from overusing one area of the body while playing a sport or exercising over a longer period of time. The following are signs of a chronic injury:

  1. Pain when performing an activity or sports
  2. A dull pain when at rest
  3. Swelling

Rotator cuff repair (RCR) is a common technique performed by Shoulder surgeons via arthroscopic, or mini-open techniques. While this operation is considered to be of low morbidity, numerous potential complications can arise either intraoperative or during the postoperative time. Some of these problems are related to the surgical method (arthroscopic or open). Many of these problems can be managed through non-operative means; however, initial recognition and timely treatment is important in limiting the long-term sequel and improving patient outcome.

What Should I Do If I Suffer an Injury?

Whether damage is acute or chronic, there is never a good reason to try to “work through” the pain of damage. When you have ache from a particular movement or activity, you need to stop doing them immediately. Continuing the activity only causes further damage. Some injuries require prompt medical attention like total shoulder replacement, while others can be self-treated. Here’s what you need to know about both types:

When to Seek Medical Treatment?

  1. You should call a health professional
  2. The injury causes extreme pain, swelling, or numbness.
  3. If you are not able to bear any weight on the area, you need to visit your physician immediately.
  4. The pain or dull ache of an old damage is accompanied by increased swelling or joint abnormality or instability.

Shoulder Surgery – Solution to Let You Perform Greater in Sport Field

What Are Sports Injuries?

The term “sports injury,” in the broadest sense, actually refers to the kinds of injuries that mostly occur during sports or workout. Some sports damages result from accidents; others are due to poor workout training practices, wrong equipment, lack of conditioning, or inadequate warm-up and stretching.

Following are the most common sports injuries:

Common Types of Sports Injuries are:

  1. Tears of the ligaments that hold joints together
  2. Tears of the tendons that support joints and help them to move
  3. Dislocated joints
  4. Muscle sprains and strains
  5. Fractured bones; including vertebrae.

What Is the Difference Between Acute and Chronic Injuries?

Irrespective of the specific structure affected, musculoskeletal sports injuries can usually be classified in one of two ways: acute or chronic.

Acute Injuries

Acute injuries, such as a sprained ankle, strained back or fractured hand, happen suddenly during any physical activity. Signs of an acute injury include the following:

  1. Sudden and extreme pain
  2. Inability to place weight on a lower limb
  3. Swelling
  4. Extremepainfulness in an upper limb
  5. Extreme limb weakness
  6. Visible dislocation
  7. Inability to move a joint through its full range of motion

Chronic Injuries

Chronic injuries generally result from overusing one area of the body while playing a sport or exercising over a longer period of time. The following are signs of a chronic injury:

  1. Pain when performing an activity or sports
  2. A dull pain when at rest
  3. Swelling

Rotator cuff repair (RCR) is a common technique performed by Shoulder surgeons via arthroscopic, or mini-open techniques. While this operation is considered to be of low morbidity, numerous potential complications can arise either intraoperative or during the postoperative time. Some of these problems are related to the surgical method (arthroscopic or open). Many of these problems can be managed through non-operative means; however, initial recognition and timely treatment is important in limiting the long-term sequel and improving patient outcome.

What Should I Do If I Suffer an Injury?

Whether damage is acute or chronic, there is never a good reason to try to “work through” the pain of damage. When you have ache from a particular movement or activity, you need to stop doing them immediately. Continuing the activity only causes further damage. Some injuries require prompt medical attention like total shoulder replacement, while others can be self-treated. Here’s what you need to know about both types:

When to Seek Medical Treatment?

  1. You should call a health professional
  2. The injury causes extreme pain, swelling, or numbness.
  3. If you are not able to bearany weight on the area, you need to visit your physician immediately.
  4. The pain or dull ache of an old damage is accompanied by increased swelling or joint abnormality or instability.