Tag Archive | bankart repair surgery

Arthroscopy: A Surgical Procedure

Arthroscopy is a surgical method that orthopedic surgeons use to visualize, diagnose, and treat injuries inside a joint. The word Arthroscopy comes from two Greek words that are: “arthro” (joint) and “skopein” (to look). The term literally means “to look within the joint.”

What is an arthroscopic surgery?

Arthroscopy is a technique for diagnosing and treating joint problems. A surgeon inserts a very narrow tube attached to a fiber-optic video camera through a small incision — about the size of a buttonhole. The vision inside your joint is transmitted to a high-definition video monitor. Arthroscopy lets the surgeon to see inside your joint without making a large incision. Orthopaedic Surgeons can even repair some types of joint injuries during arthroscopy, with pencil-thin surgical instruments inserted through additional small incisions.

When is knee arthroscopy recommended?

Your doctor may recommend knee arthroscopy if you have painful condition that does not respond to nonsurgical treatment. Some reasons for undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery include:

  1. Removal or a repair of a torn meniscus
  2. Reconstruction of a torn anterior cruciate ligament
  3. Removal of inflamed synovial tissue
  4. Trimming of damaged articular cartilage
  5. Removal of loose fragments of bones or cartilage
  6. Treatment of patella (kneecap) problems
  7. Knee sepsis (infection)

When is shoulder arthroscopy recommended?

Your doctor may recommend shoulder arthroscopy if you have painful condition that does not respond to nonsurgical treatment. Some reasons for undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery include

  1. Bankart Repair
  2. Rotator Cuff Repair
  3. Slap Repair
  4. Capsulotomy for Adhesive capsulitis
  5. AC Joint Resection

How is arthroscopy performed?

Arthroscopic surgery, although much easier in terms of recovery than “open” surgery, still requires the use of anesthetics and the special equipment in a hospital operating room or outpatient surgical suite. You will be given a general, spinal, or a local anesthetic, depending on the joint or suspected problem.

A small incision (about the size of a buttonhole) will be made to insert the arthroscope. Several other incisions may be made to see other parts of the joint or insert other instruments.

Recovering from an arthroscopy:

After your arthroscopy, you’ll be taken to a room to get better from the effects of the general anesthetics, if it was used during the process. Depending on the type of method you had, you may require a temporary sling, splint or crutches to support and guard the joint while you recover. Some people are given special pumps or compression bandages to improve their blood flow.

Recovery advice by surgeons

  1. Ensure that you elevate the joint and apply ice packs to help with swelling when you get home, only if advised to do so. You should also carry out any joint exercises that have been suggested for you.
  2. Any dressings which have been done during the process will need to be kept as dry as possible.
  3. Your wounds should start to recover within a few days. If non-dissolvable stiches were used to close them, they need to be removed after a week or two.
  4. You’ll normally be asked to be present at a follow-up appointment a few weeks after the surgery to discuss the results of the operation, your recovery, and any additional treatment you may need.
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Facts about Bankart Repair Surgery

Background:
Shoulder instability is an important medical problem. Arthroscopic surgery is an established cure modality in shoulder instability, but it continues to be linked with a high rate of repetitions and complications. The cause of the study was to examine late outcomes of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesions in patients with post-traumatic anterior shoulder unsteadiness and non-engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, with special attention on the incidence and causes of reappearances and complications. Glenohumeral instability can be considered by the direction of instability, the chronicity, and the etiology. Understanding the pathophysiology and etiology associated to the patient’s glenohumeral instability may aid in shaping their risk of recurrence and ultimately monitor management. A thorough history and physical checkup are essential. Age, activity level, athletic participation, and hand dominance should be noted. The examiner should ask about instability in the other joints, particularly the contralateral shoulder. If a painful event is related to the patient’s symptoms, the location of the arm and amount of energy involved during the result should be noted. If the patient cannot recall the position of the arm during the result, knowing the position of the arm that replicates symptoms is also useful.

Important Prevention to be taken post-surgery:
•Sleeping:
For the first three weeks your sling belt must be worn in bed. Sleeping can be little uncomfortable if you try and lie on the operated arm. We advise that you lie on your back or on the reverse side, as you choose. Ordinary pillows can be used to give you ease and support. If you are lying on your side one pillow a little folded under your neck gives enough care for most people. A pillow folded in half supports the arm in front and a pillow stuck along your back helps to avoid you rolling onto the operated shoulder during the night. If you are lying on your back, bond a pillow tightly in the middle or use a folded pillow to backing your neck. Place a folded pillow underneath the elbow of the operated arm to support that.

•Follow up Appointments:
An appointment will be made for you to see the shoulder surgeon or specialist therapist 4 weeks post-operatively.

•Daily Activities:
For the first two to three weeks most activities of daily living for example eating, dressing, cooking etc must be carried out by your un-operated arm. If suitable an occupational therapist will be available to give you guidance on how to do this.

•Leisure Activities:
Your physiotherapist and shoulder surgeon will advise you when it is safe to start again your leisure activities. This will vary according to your activity and level, as well as the period required to rehabilitate your shoulder muscles with physiotherapy.