Tag Archive | bankart repair failure symptoms

Facts about Bankart Repair Surgery

Background:
Shoulder instability is an important medical problem. Arthroscopic surgery is an established cure modality in shoulder instability, but it continues to be linked with a high rate of repetitions and complications. The cause of the study was to examine late outcomes of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesions in patients with post-traumatic anterior shoulder unsteadiness and non-engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, with special attention on the incidence and causes of reappearances and complications. Glenohumeral instability can be considered by the direction of instability, the chronicity, and the etiology. Understanding the pathophysiology and etiology associated to the patient’s glenohumeral instability may aid in shaping their risk of recurrence and ultimately monitor management. A thorough history and physical checkup are essential. Age, activity level, athletic participation, and hand dominance should be noted. The examiner should ask about instability in the other joints, particularly the contralateral shoulder. If a painful event is related to the patient’s symptoms, the location of the arm and amount of energy involved during the result should be noted. If the patient cannot recall the position of the arm during the result, knowing the position of the arm that replicates symptoms is also useful.

Important Prevention to be taken post-surgery:
•Sleeping:
For the first three weeks your sling belt must be worn in bed. Sleeping can be little uncomfortable if you try and lie on the operated arm. We advise that you lie on your back or on the reverse side, as you choose. Ordinary pillows can be used to give you ease and support. If you are lying on your side one pillow a little folded under your neck gives enough care for most people. A pillow folded in half supports the arm in front and a pillow stuck along your back helps to avoid you rolling onto the operated shoulder during the night. If you are lying on your back, bond a pillow tightly in the middle or use a folded pillow to backing your neck. Place a folded pillow underneath the elbow of the operated arm to support that.

•Follow up Appointments:
An appointment will be made for you to see the shoulder surgeon or specialist therapist 4 weeks post-operatively.

•Daily Activities:
For the first two to three weeks most activities of daily living for example eating, dressing, cooking etc must be carried out by your un-operated arm. If suitable an occupational therapist will be available to give you guidance on how to do this.

•Leisure Activities:
Your physiotherapist and shoulder surgeon will advise you when it is safe to start again your leisure activities. This will vary according to your activity and level, as well as the period required to rehabilitate your shoulder muscles with physiotherapy.

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